Review of The Ganga Shift by Mary Bernsen

Life hasn’t been easy for Isabella. She spent most of her childhood in the foster care system, and now at twenty-two she has landed herself in prison on drug charges. Her troubled past is what makes her a perfect candidate for the government’s latest scientific endeavor, Operation Gene Re-sequencing. No one will miss her. No one will question her absence. But, when it’s discovered Isabella is immune to their DNA-changing drugs, she is selected to be used as prey for those who aren’t.
Chase and Brayden couldn’t be more opposite; Chase is calm, reserved, and completely insistent that he will control the changes the virus is causing in his body. Brayden, on the other hand, has always been wild and uninhibited. He welcomes the new animalistic nature coming over him. The one thing they have in common? They both have a taste for the cute little Asian inmate who is now sharing their cell.

I am not sure what I actually expected with this book but was pleasantly surprised and it starts of with a bang and keeps going from there. Isabella is being used as a test subject for a crazed scientist to create hybrid humans that have an animalistic side, unfortunately for Isabella her stubborn side is also causing there to be no apparent effect to the serum. That leaves her stuck in the pod (a man made island) sent there by Dr Conley to force her to show her new self along with having to survive by hiding from a pack of guys who have completed the experiment and become less than human at night.
Who does she trust to keep her safe, Hayden who can get her stuff to ease the pain of whats going on and leader of the pack, Chase the cool, calm and level headed guy who is always there to help or just rely on herself as thats what she has had to do for so long.
There are plenty of surprises, twists and an ending that you are like “what!” I really hope there is going to be a book 2 in this series as I would love to know what happens next.

4*

The Ganga Shift is currently available through Amazon via Parliament House Publishing and can be found here

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